Bonjour, 2017!

Well, look at that. Yet again, 6 months have passed since my last blog post. I really am getting worse and worse at keeping up with this thing. However, I refuse to delete it, or stop, because even if my life here seems more and more normal, that doesn’t mean that there aren’t things worth sharing in more detail than I might on Facebook.

For this long overdue post, I’ve decided to start by picking up where my last post left off: Irish music festivals!

Last summer, M and I went to our second Irish music festival. We spent a week in the Alps and I loved every minute of it. In three weeks, we’ll be heading to the Brittany Winter School, an Irish festival that takes place in Arzon, in the region of Brittany. I’m so excited to go to the fiddle workshops, reunite with festival friends, and actually be able to play in a session or two. It’s such a huge change from last year, where I almost didn’t even bring my fiddle with me. One of my goals for 2017 is to record myself playing a tune every week from the Online Irish Academy of Music in order to see myself progress throughout the year. You can check out my Instagram if you want to follow along.

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My fiddle is ready, with its very own sheep cosy.

Other travel plans for this year include a week in Gosport, England at the end of March with my school, a week in Belfast in April with M, and some time in Dallas in August to celebrate our wedding (in July, in France).

I’ve had the chance to participate in the planning and realisation of an Erasmus + exchange project between our high school, a German high school, and a British high school. Over two years, 13 students from each school will work together with theater professionals to learn about WWI history and create a theater piece based on their reactions and feelings about the event and its relation to the current state of political affairs. After an international meeting in Lille in November, we will all head to England in March (and then to Germany in the fall) to finish the research and planning of the piece, which will then be performed in public in all three countries. It’s pretty fun to watch the students work together, mixing languages and personalities. It’s also nice to do something other than teach. Extracurricular activities do not take place at school in France; it’s up to the students to sign up for clubs or lessons outside of school.

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Our trip to Belfast is just an idea floating around right now. We have yet to buy tickets or book anything, but Northern Ireland and Ireland are so affordable to travel to from France that we’re not too rushed. Hopefully we’ll be flying into Dublin, driving up to Belfast, and then driving through a few other cities in Ireland, like Donegal and Sligo. We shall see!

Luckily, M’s parents agree to keep our dog Benji for us every time we travel. He really is one lucky dog. This next trip, however, they will only be keeping Benji for us, and not our dear rabbit Violette, who unfortunately died in December. We miss her so, so much. The impact that an adorable little ball of fur can have on someone’s life is incredible.

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Best bunny ever.

For our big trip to Dallas, however, we will have to find someone to keep Benji Boo for us, as Michel’s parents will be traveling to Dallas as well. We are so excited to be able to have our civil wedding here in France surrounded by close friends and family (including my immediate family who will be here!), and then to be able to celebrate with a blessing and reception in Dallas with even more friends and family who we see much too rarely. It’s going to be a busy month filled with excitement!

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Photo taken by Pierre Clément, all rights reserved.

I have a feeling things will go by very quickly up until then. I’ll keep you posted – or at least, I’ll try to!

Celti’cimes: Ireland in the Alps

About a year ago, I picked up the fiddle and started to learn Irish music. Like 99% of Americans, I claim Irish heritage. It was only natural that when M started learning the Irish flute that I join in on the fun!

I was really motivated the first three months and practiced frequently. Once I started back to work, I became too overwhelmed to practice anymore. (It’s unfortunate, because I’m sure that making music would have helped me get over the stress of teaching French high schoolers, even if it felt like I didn’t have time to do so.)

In February, we went on a trip to see our old neighbors from Lille who had recently moved to Brittany and then hopped on over to the Brittany Winter School Irish music festival for the last four days of the trip. I hadn’t signed up for any classes – there was no way I could follow, right? – but my old lessons teacher Adrien told me I should go for it, so I did. And I loved it. I got to learn from great players like Paul O’Shaughnessy and Antoin Mac Gabhann. I got a boost of confidence in seeing that I could learn quickly enough by ear and play pretty in tune without the dreadful “beginner tape” on the fingerboard.

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Albiez Montrond, where Celti’cimes takes place every year

For Celti’cimes, I immediately signed up for the workshop with fiddler Oisin Mac Diarmada for the first three days of the trip. It was a general level class, and I was definitely one of the two beginners there, but I struggled along and got some great tunes and tips out of the experience.

An outdoor session at someone's rental house - he later proposed to his girlfriend that night!
An outdoor session at someone’s rental house – he later proposed to his girlfriend that night!

Other than the actual workshop, the best parts of the festival were running into old friends that we had met at Brittany Winter School, making new friends from the workshops and sessions, and getting to meet and chat with the Irish players who were there to give the workshops and perform in concerts throughout the week.

Taking a break from the music
Taking a break from the music

Téada is one of the groups that was there for the week, and has been around for a long time, made up of amazing musicians such as Oisin Mac Diarmada (fiddle) and singer and accordion legend Séamus Begley. I got to watch Séamus Begley perform in a pub from three feet away while he sang with and accompanied Cathy Jordan from Dervish on vocals and bodhran. M and I survived an all night session with Tommy Fitzharris (flute) and Patrick Doocey (guitar). I spent a while chatting with bodhran player and TV/radio producer Tristan Rosenstock, one of the nicest guys around, who was willing to discuss American politics and listen to me chat about how much I love his show “Hup”. I got to meet one of my favorite fiddle players, Tom Morrow, who plays for Dervish. I watched some members of Dervish along with the Mulcahy sisters play in a private session in a pizza restaurant. We got to hear Eoin’s Polkas, composed by Séamus’ son, played live at a session by members of Téada. I learned one of the polkas from the recording I made at the live session.

Learning Eoin's Polka on a mountain trail
Learning Eoin’s Polka on a mountain trail

As for my personal musical experience, I practiced tunes outside with new friends from the violin workshop. I was “forced” by a new friend to play a suite of tunes at an outdoor session at 2am, after one too many beers, but had the best time ever when they encouraged me and played along. The last night, I played more than I ever have in a session before: 7 whole tunes! M and I even started a suite together. We taught each other tunes in the mountain trails, and imagined names of tunes we could compose based on the events of the week, like “The Fall of Victor” or “Breakfast Beer”. I even learned some Irish in an hour and a half class that M and I took. Now we’re both working on it together!

An outdoor session where I later played a tune by myself
An outdoor session where I later played a tune by myself
The end of an all night session, one which I will remember for many years to come!
The end of an all night session, one which I will remember for many years to come!

Experiences like this are what I love about Irish music. The tradition brings everyone together around a standard set of tunes, of all levels, of all backgrounds. We get to spend a crazy week together immersed in the music and everything that goes along with it.

I can’t wait for the next one!

a year in review

Exactly one year ago, I started my first day of work as an English teaching assistant in Douai, France. If things would’ve worked out as I was hoping for, I would be doing the same thing today! Unfortunately, that’s not the case – but when I look back at this year and everything that has happened, I am like whoa.

I spent 8 months in France, teaching 12 hours a week to French high school students. I definitely had my ups (like my great class of senior students who always greeted me with a smile) and downs (like that one time that I ended up yelling in French at my sophomores who didn’t want to listen to a word I was saying), but I definitely learned a lot. If I ever have the opportunity to do the assistantship again, I would take it.

I lived in a small city but made great friends from all over, including my roommates from Spain, Italy, and Germany and my other assistant friends living nearby.

Cydny, Sarah, me, Viviana, Inés, and Lidia

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fresh eire

This past weekend, I returned to one of my favorite countries: Ireland! In 2006, it was my first trip out of the states with some of my best high school friends and a fabulous World Experience teacher and I’ve loved it ever since. Also, I am one of the millions of people that claim Irish heritage (my family came to Illinois in the 1850’s), so that makes it extra special. Finally, two years ago, I met a special someone there.

Ha’Penny Bridge in Dublin, separating the north and south sides of the city

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she’s back? #shesback.

Ohmygoshyouguys. I’m going back to France on Tuesday! How, you ask?

When I bought my ticket to come back in May, I basically decided to buy a round trip ticket from Paris to New York and chose a random date in August for my return flight. And it’s Tuesday!

I still haven’t heard if I’ve been renewed for the assistant position. Technically, I could hear anytime up to mid-September (it’s ridiculous). If I was renewed, I would come back to the US to get my visa and be back in France by October 1st, but my hopes aren’t high.  So, this time my visit is meant for pleasure and a bit of job hunting. I’ll stay with the boy, relax outside in the garden with my tiny French coffee, ride my bike in the Hazebrouck countryside, and stroll down the (one) shopping street in town.

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dublin.

wow! what a day.

Jed and i both arrived at the airport around the same time, so we were able to get seats next to each other on our planes. after saying our goodbyes, we headed through security and towards our gate. we had just enough time to grab lunch, and then it was time to board the plane. the flights went smoothly — we only arrived 15 minutes late in Dublin. we waited for our bags near the baggage claim area, and started to get a little nervous once our baggage claim terminal shut off, indicating that there were no more suitcases to be claimed. slightly panicked, we started looking around and saw a cart with four bags on it — our bags! we had no idea why they were separated, but at least an airline employee helped us out. we walked towards the exit, and luckily, Jed spotted our friend Flo right away. we had been a bit worried since we didn’t know Flo’s phone number or address, but things worked out anyway!

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